Bargaining in Turkey for all....

#1
A few simple tips that should help you get the best prices for whatever you buy in Turkey.... within reason!

Bargaining or haggling is a tradition in Turkey as in many other countries. Shoppers in Europe and America bargain over price when they buy cars, houses and other expensive items. In Turkey, bargaining is extended to include many less valuable items, especially unique handmade goods such as carpets, crafts, artwork and antiques, items which do not have standardized markets. You can, and should also bargain for hotels rooms in many cases.

Many people find bargaining tedious and distasteful. Get over it! Pazarlik (bargaining)can be relatively pleasant when done properly.


1. Know the Market

Browse, examine goods and ask prices in several shops to get a sense of the market before bargaining.


2. Don't show enthusiasm for the item you want

A poker face pays off, believe me. Look at several items.

Don't ask prices for a while, but when you do, ask the prices of several items, whether you're interested in them or not.

Act as though the piece you really, really want is only so-so, not a big deal.

3. Decide what you think a piece is worth to you

Many people get distressed to find that someone else has bought a similar item for less. Don't worry about it!

Sometimes you'll be the one getting the best price. If you decide what an item is worth to you and pay no more than that, how can you go wrong? By definition, you've received value for your money. People who play the "I-got-it-cheaper" game need to get a life.

4. Let the shopkeeper quote the first price

If a shopkeeper asks "What will you pay?" you should ask again "What's the price?" The shopkeeper's price will be higher than what they expects you to pay.

There's no fixed formula for making your counter offer.

It should be substantially less than you expect or want to pay, a half or even a quarter of the shopkeeper's price (depending on how inflated that is). If your counter offer is way too low, however, the shopkeeper will know he's dealing with someone who doesn't know the market (see Rule No. 1, above.

It's always easier to get a lower price if you buy several items, just like anywhere in the world.

6. Don't be arrogant and haggle over pennies

If you're close to agreement on price, don't let a few pennies get in the way of your satisfaction.

7. Don't be afraid to walk away...(and perhaps come back)

Funny how you always seem to get the best price on an item if you can convince yourself that you really don't need it. If you really can't bring yourself to pay the shopkeeper's final price, thank him or her and walk out of the shop.

Seeing a potential sale walking away, the shopkeeper may meet your price (or at least offer a further discount).

If not, then you've learned that the shopkeeper's price is firm, and you can return in an hour or a day and buy the item at that price, or you can look for it elsewhere, knowing the market better.

8. Never, Never feel obligated to buy unless you've agreed on a price

Shopping is a social custom in Turkey. You will be offered tea, coffee or soft drinks, and perhaps cigarettes, snacks, perhaps even a meal.

The shopkeeper may wait on you for a considerable time, showing you dozens of items and explaining their qualities. Even so, you are not obligated to buy anything at all!

Distrust any shopkeeper who tries to burden you with the feeling that you should buy because they have spent a lot of time with you.

Leave the shop and don't go back. You have no obligation whatsoever!

9. Assume that any price agreed upon is for cash

Banks charge anywhere from 2% to 6% to clear a credit card transaction. Unless you have discussed the payment method, any price arrived at is presumed to be payable in cash.

The shopkeeper may charge you the credit card fee, or a fee for changing travellers cheques.

You should check to see if you can pay in any method other than YTL cash, and what requirements there might be. If you pay in US dollars, Euros or another strong currency, you may even get a discount.

10. Take your purchases with you if possible

Many shops will ship your purchase home for you reliably, a few may not. There have been instances in which someone has purchased an expensive carpet but had a cheap similar carpet arrive at their home.

In a few cases, the purchase is never shipped, or is "lost in shipment." If you must have the shop ship your purchase, find out as much as possible about the shipping process, and try to confirm all aspects of it.
 

Mella

Administrator
Staff member
Site Admin
#2
That is a really helpful article there mate. Tbh I wish I had of read something like that before I ever went shopping in Turkey for the first time.

merlin said:
Shopping is a social custom in Turkey. You will be offered tea, coffee or soft drinks, and perhaps cigarettes, snacks, perhaps even a meal.

The shopkeeper may wait on you for a considerable time, showing you dozens of items and explaining their qualities. Even so, you are not obligated to buy anything at all!
Every shop did that to me, gave me tea, coke, biscuits, ciggerettes...It's a great little tactic, muggins here felt so bad I bought so much that way :eek:
 
#3
Carmella said:
That is a really helpful article there mate. Tbh I wish I had of read something like that before I ever went shopping in Turkey for the first time.



Every shop did that to me, gave me tea, coke, biscuits, ciggerettes...It's a great little tactic, muggins here felt so bad I bought so much that way :eek:
Thanks mella, I must remember to show you a few items I have for sale next time you are over!

an old cooker, empty gas bottle and 3 legged chair.

Bargains!

(Thanks!)
 
#4
hahaha @mel!!

i get soo stressed shoppin in turkey i get hassled to death n then instead of telling me prices they ask me to go to bars with them n stuff!!!lol only the guys in the bazaar tho, i end up not buying anything because i cant browse in peace!!
 

Mella

Administrator
Staff member
Site Admin
#5
kusadasigirl69 said:
hahaha @mel!!

i get soo stressed shoppin in turkey i get hassled to death n then instead of telling me prices they ask me to go to bars with them n stuff!!!lol only the guys in the bazaar tho, i end up not buying anything because i cant browse in peace!!
Yeah I got mega stressed, too.

When I was in bodrum I found this great shop that sold sexy clothes...There was this Kid, he looked like he was 11 years old. He was following me round the entire time. I was in there for about 30 minutes browsing..he followed my every move and kept saying 'want to buy?' about 400 times. I wanted to buy so much, but he pissed me off so much with his hard sale that I cut my nose off despite my face & I frog marched out of the shop huffing and puffing.

I always just flirt alot with the guys tbh, it has never failed me yet. obviously I couldn't do that with the little boy. Shame..

I'm gonna print this article out and hand it to people at the airport heading for Turkey.
 
#6
yeh flutter youre eyelashes n that u get a cheaper price!!!always go shopping in bikini top n hotpants!!!Lol u get the best discount but harrased to death with things such as (personal experience) nice legs wat time do they open!!!!
 
#8
We tend to always just head to one shop, (it doesnt matter whether u go to one or all of them, they're the same clothes!) which we became regulars in in the summer, its really good coz we get fairly cheap prices, and at christmas he even gave us some free 'christmas present' clothes so it pays to know the people working there!!!! lol
 
#9
I get sucked in with the "have a tea" thing too..
I feel so awful because the seller has spent so long with me I feel I have to buy something.. I have come ohome with all sorts of rubbish before now. I feel I have the word "lemon" on my head because they see me coming a mile off.
I am going to try it your way next time Merlin.. Thanks!!
 

**claire**

Super Moderator
#10
Did anyone have much success with Haggling this summer??

I noticed both In Marmaris & Kusadasi that the market traders were a lot less flexible on their prices!

many items were priced & they would not haggle (especially noticed this with buying things like apple tea & Turkish delight!)
 
#11
I just got back from Kusadasi.It was my first time in Turkey and I guess the most interesting part of the vacation was indeed the shopping part.I got some good prices bargaining with the guys from the bazaar but also some not so good.I liked the "cup of tea" part so much that i was even asking for it every shop i got in.
Can`t wait for next summer/fall to go shopping again. :)
 
#14
I was in Kusadasi in June, and I found that the market stalls all had more fixed prices. It was as if they had agreed minimum prices and wouldn't budge.

I still think of how much I want to pay, half it and then start the haggling there. It tends to work most of the time.

It pays to be cheeky, because a lot of the time they are being cheeky by trying to get you to pay 10 times the amount for something.
 
#15
At the bazaars the prices definately go up and they won't budge as much when the big cruise liners are in!! Stay on the beach when they are in town!

Apparetly the Americans will pay anything they don't like haggling!
 

**claire**

Super Moderator
#16
Sarah 85 said:
At the bazaars the prices definately go up and they won't budge as much when the big cruise liners are in!! Stay on the beach when they are in town!

Apparetly the Americans will pay anything they don't like haggling!
The trouble is with that Sarah is that there are cruise ships in every day! :(

i definatley noticed less haggling going on!
 
#19
We had one bad experience in the Bazaar with the guy calling us cheap tourists cos he wanted 40ytl for a sweatshirt and I offered him 20ytl. But i went further in to the kaleici? area and got the same sweatshirt for 20ytl without any haggling!!! Guess where I bought the rest of my shopping!! Generally as we got browner the prices seemed to drop. Do they reckon your not as gullible later in your holiday as you've checked out the prices already?
 
Top