Turkish bread

#25
Turkish bread is lovely i love the inflated bread they give you in restaurants, sorry i dont know the proper name i tried to search for recipes but i didnt have much luck does anyone know how to make it?
 

Fleur

Connoisseur
#27
You mean lavaş !!
Actually, I don't think Turkish bread is nice as it used to be.
The best bread I have ever eaten was on North Cyprus.
Don't eat too much though, it is very fattening.
 
#28
I enjoy Turkish bread but disagree that you can't get good bread in the Uk. And for variety we are really spoilt. You have to support your local shops like the Turkish people do. I love batch bread (sometimes called plain bread), stoneground wholemeal, the little cottager loaves that are all floury on top, multigrain and seeded batch bread, oat bread. Close to work I can also get polish black bread, rye bread, italian bread and of course baguettes and vienna loaves. The small rolls are also great everything from baps, to floury, breakfast, little crusty ones and the small loaves.
I think its great that even the corner shops in Turkey sell fresh yeast, i love to make all sorts of bread, by hand not machine, I find it very therapeutic and calming, but I bet I would get much better results with fresh yeast.
 

Dan Druff

Kusadasi Enthusiast
#29
Waverley;233076 said:
I enjoy Turkish bread but disagree that you can't get good bread in the Uk. And for variety we are really spoilt. You have to support your local shops like the Turkish people do. I love batch bread (sometimes called plain bread), stoneground wholemeal, the little cottager loaves that are all floury on top, multigrain and seeded batch bread, oat bread. Close to work I can also get polish black bread, rye bread, italian bread and of course baguettes and vienna loaves. The small rolls are also great everything from baps, to floury, breakfast, little crusty ones and the small loaves.
I think its great that even the corner shops in Turkey sell fresh yeast, i love to make all sorts of bread, by hand not machine, I find it very therapeutic and calming, but I bet I would get much better results with fresh yeast.
At last someone who is not wearing Kuşadası rose tinted glasses! Good on you Waverly. There are wonderful breads made all over the world, Turkey doesn't have the patent. Each country has it's own applications for bread. For example, how could you make sandwiches with Turkish bread. An English Sandwich or farmhouse loaf is the perfect basis for a thinly sliced tomato or cucumber sandwich with a slight sprinkling of salt... absolute heaven! At a stretch, one could possibly make a French onion soup with Turkish bread but a real French loaf cannot be beaten for this purpose. Also don't knock the humble bread machine; it;s so easy to use and from our numerous experiments with different methods and ingredients we have discovered that the most delicious result is using a basic loaf recipe (From the instruction book) with the addition of dried fenugreek leaves. (Çemen), which are easily grown here from seed in your back garden.
 

zeytin

Connoisseur
#30
I loved the crusty cobs from sayers mmmmm delish with butter, corned beef and brown sauce. and the homemade granary bread, there,s loads of lovely bread in the uk. Well, there is in the North west anyway. Mavis
 
#31
Dan

Not knocking the bread machine... its a great invention, I just love making bread by hand, the whole kneading and knocking back process, takes time but it is also great for stress relief. I just enjoy it. It reminds me that in my rather hectic life, some things are worth taking time over.

I do some nice variations like onion bread and garlic, also differnent fruits and seeds.
 

zeytin

Connoisseur
#33
I,m not really sure! now that youve asked, couldnt say i noticed the shop sign (6 weeks ago) when i was there, But it was still a bakers and still had the crusty cobs:) Mavis
 
#34
Dear Chrisadasi.
I am from denmark and we have some turkish shops and they have the bread you are talking abouth,it is good.
Maybe you have a turkish shop close to you.
calla8 god speed. :)