Anadolu Kavaǧi village, an attraction near Istanbul

Mella

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#1
Anadolu Kavaǧi is part of Istanbul’s beautiful landscape. The small fishing village is located on the northern edge of the Anatolian side of the Bosphorus. Several decades ago it's reputation was limited to Istanbul area inhabitants; nowadays many international visitors visit Anadolu Kavaǧi for an unforgettable experience.

The idyllic village is especially praised for it's fish restaurants and green scenery. The food is always fresh and cheap, as compared to Istanbul restaurants and the surrounding is appealing to any foreigner eager to find a peaceful piece of land to enjoy sunshine.
Some years ago, Anadolu Kavaǧi could only be reached from the water, due to being part of a military zone; now you have easy access to it by car, taking the high way. The village is just outside Istanbul, on Macar Bay, not far from the Yoros Castle.

The sea way is still available for those seeking a more pleasurable trip. The boat ride can be fun and exciting, followed by a magic dinner in one of the shoreline restaurants.

Enjoy a plate of fried mussels and a glass of raki or ayran to taste the local delicacies. Do not leave without trying the local waffles and ice-cream!

Daily ferryboat excursions are organized to Anadolu Kavaǧi. The foreigners take the challenge to visit the ruins of the ancient fortress (Yoros) and stroll about the village exploring its opportunities.

This is the place where the Bosphorus flows into the Black Sea; the spectacle is fantastic for any insatiable viewer. The highest hill of the village, Yuşa, is considered a sacred place by the locals for many centuries, relying on an ancient Greek legend. Trek up the hill to find out more things about the local legacy. If you are not interested in the historical value of the hill, take this chance to catch a breathtaking panorama over the Asian side of the Bosphorus and the sea. If you have your camera with you, it’s just about time to take some amazing photos at the top of the hill.

This is also a pretty popular place for a picnic or barbecue in the afternoons. Go back down the hill to enjoy the rest of the day walking through the village along the souvenir stalls and dondurma sellers who will surely persuade you to buy something memorable.

The villagers of Anadolu Kavağı historically depended mostly on fishing for income, but it appears some may have acted as 'wreckers'. Turkish rumors report that they would light fires in order to disorient ships and ground them in the narrow straits, seizing their goods. Conversely, many claim that Anadolu Kavağı was also used as a shelter for trade ships against storms, where it is recorded even up to three hundred ships were serviced at a time.

Once you are in Istanbul, find a day to visit the Anadolu Kavaǧi small coastal village, a pleasant and peaceful setting for a relaxing journey.

Source: Sunexpress



















 
#4
I haven't been to that point, it looks lovely.
On the opposite side of the bosphorus is a beautiful village on the edge of the black sea called kilyos. It's small and friendly out of season but in season it has the sensation of becoming something akin to a british seaside resort! Lovely long sandy beach which we took a horse ride along with the girls..great fun, and not too far from central European Istanbul.

Also, there are fantastic forests and picnic spots after tarabya. Well worth a drive along the coast out of Istanbul (towards the black sea end, not the golden horn end) to visit the 'villages'. Fantastic fish restaurants can be discovered.

Charlotte
 
#5
teosgirl;219023 said:
Lovely long sandy beach which we took a horse ride along with the girls..great fun, and not too far from central European Istanbul.


Charlotte
Yes Kilyos beach is good but only for horse riding :) Not for swimming or sun bath. Black sea is absoluteley different from Aegean Sea (Also Marmara Sea is same. Full of jellyfishes and less salty). Please do not think that a kind of Copacabana. Also, in my opinion that beachs only for desperate university sutudents who failed in the June exams and have no chance to go out of Istanbul to sunny shiny southern coast :)
 
#6
That's probably true Mark, it was the first time Ferhan had been in 42 years, so it must not have a good reputation for swimming. We went in december so didn't even think about it.

I did notice a couple of beach clubs, but apart from that never assumed it was a type of copacabana! It's pretty much a small turkish villlage.
I was just suprised to see such a large sandy beach, so close to Istanbul city centre.


Charlotte
 
#7
teosgirl;219169 said:
That's probably true Mark, it was the first time Ferhan had been in 42 years, so it must not have a good reputation for swimming. We went in december so didn't even think about it.

I did notice a couple of beach clubs, but apart from that never assumed it was a type of copacabana! It's pretty much a small turkish villlage.
I was just suprised to see such a large sandy beach, so close to Istanbul city centre.


Charlotte
That's right Charlotte, it's shocking for Istanbul :) I did not meant your experience, that was just my view. I lived in there 12 years and now always miss Istanbul here. But in the same time I critisize every wrong part of it.

By the way in 1950ies (not longer than this) all people were swimming even on the Bosphorus coast. But now you can only see slumdog millionaires in the cold water of Bosphorus :)
 
#8
I think for me there's still alot of suprising things to see in Istanbul;I never associated Istanbul with beaches so it was an interesting trip. I know people who were born and raised in Istanbul that have not seen every place or attraction, but that's understandable; it's a huge city! It's probably the same for Londonders.

I've heard and seen pictures r.e. the swimming before, and Ferhans father talked about the bosphorus freezing over during the winter once and people walking from the Asian side to European side...I wonder if that will ever happen again?
Would love to see it!

Charlotte
 
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