Tire Market

travelexpert

Director of Travel Services
#41
Thank you Travel Expert. After reading your oost we decided to visit Tire today and are glad we did. The market was very smaller with prices and quality the same as here in Kusadasi. Parking was very easy. We had an early lunch before going around the market: Tire kofte in stewed tomatoes and beetroot served with side dishes of salad, pickles, yogurt and mounds of different breads. The dessert was white cheese covered with black mulberry jam. Delicious and very different from anything I've had in Kusadasi.
The jewellers' shops were also very different; windows filled with dazzling displays of exquisitely designed and crafted gold bracelets and rings.
Beautiful and touristic it's not but it is a very interesting real working town, where you'll hear very little English. We'll certainly go again but next time on a Tuesday when Ann has a day off.
Hopefully the weather will be better so we can spend more time exploring the town and some of the interesting looking places en route.

I'm looking forward to reading more of your useful travel information posts.
thanks for the very helpful post...

i would say "great minds think alike"
here is my Tire kofte that i cooked at home this evening, never leave you alone http://lockerz.com/s/180337628 also tweeted right away - served with tomatoes, celery
after following the Tire thread last night :D.
I couldn't stop myself, opened up the pack of Tire kofte kept in the freezer. Worst thing is it had to be cooked only with butter, no olive oil or any other oil, -- guess who is guilty about it :sneaky:
 
#42
I have been to Tire by car and dolmus and on all occasions I have been blown away by the quality, quantity and value of the goods. I had been looking for a USA plug 'convertor' - ther in the middle of Tire market I found one for the staggering fee of 1TL! Equally, if you wanted to buy live chickens or rabbits they could be yours too!

As few tourists go to the market I found the local school children very interested;: wanting to practice their English (and me trying to practice my pigeon Turkish) and asking me to take photos of them. As always, Turkish hospitality shone through

It is well worth stopping for lunch in one of the local cafes - scrummy food and so cheap. much better than cooking at home!

Tire is VERY definitely worth a visit.
 

AlanK

Connoisseur
#43
Thank you Travel Expert. After reading your post we decided to visit Tire today and are glad we did. The market was very small with prices and quality the same as here in Kusadasi. Parking was very easy. We had an early lunch before going around the market: Tire kofte in stewed tomatoes and beetroot served with side dishes of salad, pickles, yogurt and mounds of different breads. The dessert was white cheese covered with black mulberry jam. Delicious and very different from anything I've had in Kusadasi and very inexpensive.
The jewellers' shops were also very different; windows filled with dazzling displays of exquisitely designed and crafted gold bracelets and rings.
Beautiful and touristic it's not but it is a very interesting, real working town, where you'll hear very little English. We'll certainly go again, but next time on a Tuesday when Ann has a day off.
Hopefully the weather will be better so we can spend more time exploring the town and some of the interesting looking places en route.

I'm looking forward to reading more of your useful travel information posts.
Ann had not been well and was having a day off work. As the weather was fine and bright we decided that it was time to return to Tire. The drive was very enjoyable, with very little traffic; passing through Selçuk, we saw the majestic storks had returned, and afterwards, the roadside verges were massed with spring flowers and there was mile after mile of fields of pink blossom-laden peach trees.
Although it was around mid-day when we arrived we had no trouble parking close to the town centre and set off to explore the market. We were immediately struck by the number of mosques, often less than 100 metres apart. Although the town has a population only about 20% greater than that of Kuşadası, and is smaller in area, it has 37 active mosques. However we could only ever hear one call to prayer, though all mosques had their own PA systems. We soon reached the market which spreads through many narrow streets, all with interesting and varied shops. The market was colourful, extensive and interesting but seemed to lack the ''buzz'' and vitality of those of Selçuk and Kuşadası; the vendors didn't shout out their wares. I still prefer Selçuk market over all others I've visited so far.
By now it was time for lunch so we stopped in the busiest pide salonu we could find. The waiters seemed a little apprehensive and didn't know how to deal with us but, eventually one plucked up courage, gathered a range of different dishes and approached us to take our order. He nearly dropped his tray when we greeted him and gave our order in Turkish. The meal was promptly served and delicious. The bill for two kiymalı pide, salad, coke, ayran and water was 10 lira.
We had earlier passsed the Culture Centre and, thinking it might contain a museum or art gallery, decided to pay a visit. It was in fact the Belediye where people were paying their bills. The security man greeted us in perfect English ''WC search Sir?'' and directed us to the toilets. At first, because I wasn't expecting him to speak English, I didn't understand him and he had to repeat himself. He then took us outside and pointed us towards the museum.
The museum was small but very interesting and free - well worth a visit.
Next we went up the hill insearch of remnants of the town's old felt trade. About halfway up the hill, Ann spied an icecream freezer and , although she thought it might be too early in the year, decided to investigate. Her luck was in, it was full - but locked. The shop owner soon came to her aid and proffered many chocolate and cream confections which Ann declined. She explained that she wanted ice because of her high cholesterol so he burrowed deep below the surface and found an ice-pop. I asked how much and, on being told 1.5 TL asked for two. I gave him three lira and he immediately returned 1.5. I had mis-understood, he had assumed that I would want two and had told me the total price when I asked. How honest!
We continued up the hill, passing many picturesque buildings and quite a few near derelict too. We didn't find any felt works but we did find a tea garden with a panoramic view of the town, its mosques and environs. It was too misty to take clear photographs so I'll leave that for another visit. We were the only customers and were served by a very attentive and polite young boy. We each had two teas . He asked for three lira and, when I gave him four tried to return one of them.
I was now time to return. We had intended to stop for tea at the famous Değirmen Şelale Lokantası and to visit the ancient Belevi Mausoleum on the way home, but Ann was too tired.They'll be for another day out.
We both thoroughly enjoyed our little excursion.
 

pajoe

Connoisseur
#44
Ann had not been well and was having a day off work. As the weather was fine and bright we decided that it was time to return to Tire. The drive was very enjoyable; very little traffic, the roadside verges were massed with spring flowers and there was mile after mile of fields of pink blossom covered peach trees.
Although it was around mid-day when we arrived we had no trouble parking close to the town centre and set off to explore the market. We were immediately struck by the number of mosques, often less than 100 metres apart. Although the town has a population only about 20% greater than that of Kuşadası, and is smaller in area it has 37 active mosques. However we could only ever hear one call to prayer, though all mosques had their own PA systems. We soon reached the market which spreads through many narrow streets, all with interesting and varied shops. The market was colourful, extensive and interesting but seemed to lack the ''buzz'' and vitality of those of Selçuk and Kuşadası; the vendors didn't shout out their wares. I still prefer Selçuk market over all others I've visited so far.
By now it was time for lunch so we stopped in the busiest pide salonu we could find. The waiters seemed a little apprehensive and didn't know how to deal with us but, eventually one plucked up courage, gathered a range of different dishes and approached us to take our order. He nearly dropped his tray when we greeted him and gave our order in Turkish. The meal was promptly served and delicious. The bill for two kiymalı pide, coke, ayran and water was 10 lira.
We had earlier passsed the Culture Centre and, thinking it might contain a museum or art gallery, decided to pay a visit. It was in fact the Belediye where people were paying their bills. The security man greeted us in perfect English ''WC search Sir?'' and directed us to the toilets. He then took us outside and pointed us towards the museum.
The museum was small but very interesting and free - well worth a visit.
Next we went up the hill insearch of remnants of the town's old felt trade. About halfway up the hill Ann spied an icecream freezer and , although she thought it might be too early in the year, decided to investigate. Her luck was in, it was full - but locked. The shop owner soon came to her aid and proffered many chocolate and cream confections which Ann declined. She explained that she wanted ice because of her high cholesterol so he burrowed deep below the surface and found an ice-pop. I asked how much and, on being told 1.5 TL asked for two. I gave him three lira and he immediately returned 1.5. I had mis-understood, he had assumed that I would want two and had told me the total price when I asked. How honest!
We continued up the hill, passing many picturesque buildings and quite a few near derelict too. We didn't find any felt works but we did find a tea garden with a panoramic view of the town, its mosques and environs. It was too misty to take clear photographs so I'll leave that for another visit. We were the only customers and were served by a very attentive and polite young boy. We each had two teas . He asked for three lira and, when I gave him four tried to return one of them.
I was now time to return. We had intended to stop for tea at the famous Değirmen Şelale Lokantası and to visit the ancient Belevi Mausoleum on the way home, but Ann was too tired.They'll be for another day out.
We both thoroughly enjoyed our little excursion.
Seriously,have you ever thought of writing for 'Time Out' Travel guides. You are so informative,and always interesting.
 

deanlo

Forum Legend
#48
Hi All
Thinking about trying a visit to Tire market anyone been lately and could share their experience,parking,lunch,travel time etc.

Thx

Dean
 

joy

Sweet Yorkshire Rose
#49
Only been once and you can find parking on street away from the market area,lunch from what I seen and experienced was small local places dotted everywhere...but it was so crowded it was difficult to see what was available....would need to explore more.
 

deanlo

Forum Legend
#50
Only been once and you can find parking on street away from the market area,lunch from what I seen and experienced was small local places dotted everywhere...but it was so crowded it was difficult to see what was available....would need to explore more.
Thx Joy.
 

Anthony07

Welsh Prince
#51
Can anybody please give me Good directions for the market in Tire from Kusadasi, or preferably Guzelcamli with all the roads blocked in to Kus.:thumbsup: :tup:
 
#52
When I went I took the dolmus from Kus to Selcuk and then on to Tire (have driven, too - go thro Selcuk and after approx. 2 km there is a sign for Tire).
I just followed signs for Centrum and then followed the signs - prob not the specific directions you need but as the market is so huge you WILL come across it.
 

Anthony07

Welsh Prince
#53
When I went I took the dolmus from Kus to Selcuk and then on to Tire (have driven, too - go thro Selcuk and after approx. 2 km there is a sign for Tire).
I just followed signs for Centrum and then followed the signs - prob not the specific directions you need but as the market is so huge you WILL come across it.

Thanks for that, we are going to have a look see next week most prob. :)
 

deanlo

Forum Legend
#54
Anthony
The main roundabout in Tire is the start of the market that is where the market climbs up the hill dont know how much of it we saw but it looks vast.There was a nice little locanta on the roundabout and the waiter there spoke great English.

Dean
 
#56
For me the easiest way was Dolmus to Selcuk and then in Selcuk Dolmus park you will easily see the Secuk to Tire Dolmus.
A nice pleasant trip inland via some farming villages
 
#58
For me the easiest way was Dolmus to Selcuk and then in Selcuk Dolmus park you will easily see the Secuk to Tire Dolmus.
A nice pleasant trip inland via some farming villages
Gosh you were brave its exceptionally hot at Tire in summer ! I enjoy the market but early or late season. Not braved in a dolmus.
 
#59
If anyone is still awake, in Kusadasi now, wanted to go to Tire market tomorrow, but just been tyold by a waiter it will not be on, something about a festival everyone celebrates. If true, bugger, had our hearts on going. Is it vworth a visit without the market?? How about Aydin, is that worth a visit?
 

peril

Connoisseur
#60
Sorry Natalie- it's Bayram Seker - the Muslim Christmas effectively - so you're out of luck this week- I don't know about next week - you might be ok then. Most government offices banks etc are shut for the next three days at least- this year the holiday has been extended to nine days but I don't know if things will shut for nine days. The Tuesday market in kusadasi was held in a small modified form today instead of tomorrow - but the Wednesday and Friday market are going ahead as normal - probably not as many stalls though. There are many antiquities and ancient sites dotted though tire which, if you're interested, are well worth seeing and better able to be seen without the market. As for Aydin- have only passed through but it's a long way to go on a dolmus in this heat on spec.
 
Top