Will Egypt fall?

Steve B

Connoisseur
#1
Will the goverment of Hosni Mubarak fall this weekend? Will the military take over in an attempt to prevent the muslim brotherhood from making Egypt into another theocracy like Iran? I don't know, but all I can say is that we are living in dangerous times in this region. As CNN International put it, if the Tunisian uprising was a 3 or 4 on the ricther scale, than this has the possibility to be a 8 or 9, as Egypt is the most populous arab nation. According to CNN, the police appear to have left the streets of Cairo, leaving it to the military, who have been called in to all the major cities. A general curfew starting at 16:00 Cairo time took effect to little avail. Also the goverment ordered the shutting of all mobile phone and internet operators. Also, the ruling parties headquarters has been torched. Gunfire has been heard on the streets of Cairo.
 

Steve B

Connoisseur
#4
Unbelievable and so swift Tony, so far, the army has been welcomed by the protestors, will they join with the protestors or will they remain above the caos, or will they have to take a more tougher stance to back the goverment, their are so many unknown variables on this, it's going to keep me awak, as the reprecussions for this region are enormous. Bet you the Turkish foreign minister won't utter a word on this, lol!
 

Steve B

Connoisseur
#5
Interesting to note, Hosni Mubarak has not been seen on tv, even though he was scheduled to address the nation an hour or so ago, wonder what's up with this. Also, Al Jazeera is just reporting that the national air carrier, Egyptair, has suspended all flights into Egypt, probably to protect their aircraft, but troubling for tourists, diplomats and their families, and the Egyptian people.
 

iamTravelr

Admin
Staff member
Blogger
#6
i hope this wave (actually hurricane) spread to all poor countries that leading by dictators. I also hope some of our politicians (no need to name them, yea) get some lessons from this.
 

Steve B

Connoisseur
#7
Umit;298021 said:
i hope this wave (actually hurricane) spread to all poor countries that leading by dictators. I also hope some of our politicians (no need to name them, yea) get some lessons from this.
I agree Umit, but am troubled and worried if the muslim brotherhood gets in, then what was it all for, to replace a repressive goverment with another one with probable policies much worse then those it would replace.
 

peril

Connoisseur
#8
Only discovered today that the Muslim Brotherhood renounced violence in the late 1970's and is not a banned organisation in the UK. Egypt is without doubt suffering a huge crisis at the moment and my heart goes out to a people who have long lived in abject poverty while the ruling party snaffles all the wealth.
 

Steve B

Connoisseur
#9
After checking for Egyptair and Cairo airport on the internet, yes, Egypt has shut down the internet providers in Egypt, you won't get anything from Egypt on an Egyptian ISP. The situation is so fluid, the head of the Egyptian armed forces cut short a trip to the US and is heading back to Egypt. Also Al Jazeera is reporting that their are reports of the army has clashed with the police, and commentators are predicting a swift downfall of Mubarak, maybe even possible that the army has surrounded his residence. It's going to be a long weekend.
 
#10
Peril, It has always been that way since Ottoman times, up to the present, the poverty the ordinary egyptian lives under is terrible. I also only hope for a better future for the majority of egyptians, and hopefully no significant violence, a peacefull change of power, for the sake of the country.
 

peril

Connoisseur
#12
Watching Al-Jazeera live at the moment. The army seems to be in charge on the streets of Cairo-in some parts anyway. No certainty who they are backing though -the government or the protesters. The police have been disarmed - those who didn't run away that is.
 
#13
Yes its right to get rid of corrupt old regimes but what replaces them can be worse, Iran for example. Reminds me of the 70s when the old european dictatorships in Portugal, Greece and Spain fell in quick succession. Then the end of communism happened at super quick speed except in China.
 
#14
I wonder if Mubarak is playing it cool at this time. Everytime the Tunisian leader spoke before he was overthrown, it just seemed to arouse the protestors more, so maybe his is lying low, and seeing how the cards play out. Maybe hoping the crowds tire out as night turns to day...only time will tell.

Just announced moments ago according to CNN that Hosni Mubarak will address the nationa shortly, as CNN says, "we'll wait and see, as he has been a no-show so far".

He is speaking live right now!
 
#15
Watching him now (Mubarak). Interesting words - He seems to be saying that his given freedoms have enabled the current position. I really thought he would be on a plane tonight. This is going to sweep right through the region.
Now says he is forming a new government tomorrow but he is still in charge. Looks like it may kick off big time
 
#16
Supreme;298038 said:
Watching him now (Mubarak). Interesting words - He seems to be saying that his given freedoms have enabled the current position. I really thought he would be on a plane tonight. This is going to sweep right through the region.
Now says he is forming a new government tomorrow but he is still in charge. Its going to kick off big time
So interesting, yes, a new goverment will be formed tomrrow, but he has shown his cards, he will stay in power, come what may. I don't think his words will placate the protestors, so many young, especially men unemployed or underemployed with basic food prices rising almost daily. I do believe he still has the confidence of the military, and I believe the protestors will tire out for now, but watch what may happen come later in the day. I didn't know either way if he would have left the country, but I think he is a little more wirey then the Tunisian leader was, and has more of a network supporting him. It will be intersting to see how the rest of the weekend plays out. Hopefully with little or no more violence which ever way it goes.
 
#17
Steve B;298039 said:
So interesting, yes, a new goverment will be formed tomrrow, but he has shown his cards, he will stay in power, come what may. I don't think his words will placate the protestors, so many young, especially men unemployed or underemployed with basic food prices rising almost daily. I do believe he still has the confidence of the military, and I believe the protestors will tire out for now, but watch what may happen come later in the day. I didn't know either way if he would have left the country, but I think he is a little more wirey then the Tunisian leader was, and has more of a network supporting him. It will be intersting to see how the rest of the weekend plays out. Hopefully with little or no more violence which ever way it goes.
Totally agree Steve - even though I edited my last comment. I get a sense that news agencies expected him to go. There is no come back from these events for Mubarak. Blaming the government for ultimately his responsibility really isn't going to cut it. Both Syria and Jordan look venerable too, Algeria and possibly Iran. The common traits - namely high level corruption, lack of trust in the police service and a complete respect of the military remind very much of another situation as Umit touched on.........
 
#18
Supreme;298040 said:
Totally agree Steve - even though I edited my last comment. I get a sense that news agencies expected him to go. There is no come back from these events for Mubarak. Blaming the government for ultimately his responsibility really isn't going to cut it. Both Syria and Jordan look venerable too, Algeria and possibly Iran. The common traits - namely high level corruption, lack of trust in the police service and a complete respect of the military remind very much of another situation as Umit touched on.........
Bang on the money Supreme, but the big difference between Syria and Iran, and all the rest, Tunisia, Egypt, Jordan, etc, is that they will think twice about turning the army against their own, and would the army do it, whereas the Syrian dictator and the Iranian theocracy wouldn't think twice about slaughtering tens of thousands of their own to stay in power, whatever the cost.
 
#19
Those young people are absolutely amazing .The courage that this took has not been reported enough and with young people in the world like this it can only give us all hope.
Thats the good news !
This doesnt have to be a doom and gloom scenario ,and for the Egyptians it is the opposite.I have travelled all over Egypt and lived among the rich and poor alike ,today I have been a nervous wreck ,no contact and listening to the usual BBC bias I have swung from despair and joy.Concern for their well being but celebrating their freedom and courage.This isnt about the brotherhood ,it is about Egypt and its people and for the first time in 30 years they have HOPE.Living in graveyards ,cleaning the streets of Cairo ,walking alongside open sewers in most parts,the excitement of catching and killing a cat and passing it of as chicken to your children because they will eat well and not go hungry that night,oh yes I have seen it all.Not to mention the evil rich foreign paedophiles treating the children to an ice cream and a swim in the big posh pool .Poverty has many layers and many are ignored and unspoken.
Now they have the courage,they will not be stopped they can shape their own democracy ,I hope their different faiths keep them strong and united and I hope Obummer (no I spelt it right )and other world leaders take care of their own and mind their own business .Rant over ,sorry but a bit hyper tonight !
 
#20
can you please keep posting what you are seeing I cannot get much thankyou
Have they protected their museum and artifact ? I am sure the people and army will work together on that
the police wont run away they are THEM -just poor people they and the army will have to choose -it will be the plain clothed thugs that u have to watch out for
 
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